Breyer Capital is Leading the Series A Financing of Paige:AI

MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER is Honored to Announce that Breyer Capital is Leading the Series A Financing of Paige:AI 

#VC #Startup #AI #Pathology #MedicalTech

JB-Vest-Seated-Wall-Background

A true visionary – prominent investor in the world, Mr. Breyer and his firm, Breyer Capital, are leading a $25 million Series A round for Paige.AI , a New York-based startup applying AI to pathology to improve diagnosis and treatment of cancer. 

Introducing Paige.AI

Paige.AI has signed a comprehensive license with the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) to gain exclusive access to its intellectual property in computational pathology, as well as exclusive rights to its library of 25 million pathology slides. The de-identified data set is one of the world’s largest tumor pathology archives, the company said.

The company will be fully integrated into lab information systems by using the library to develop machine learning applications which is developing computational programs across diagnostic pathology and clinical annotations and anonymized genomic sequencing results such as starting with breast, prostate and other major cancers, according to a company press release.

“Over the next decade there will be several companies in the fields of artificial intelligence and medicine that will provide enormous investment returns and at the same time make fundamental differences in patients’ and doctors’ lives,” Mr. Breyer said.Screen Shot 2018-02-28 at 7.25.38 AMPathology is at the cornerstone of most cancer diagnoses, yet most pathologic diagnoses rely on manual, subjective processes developed ages ago. While slide digitization has been around for over a decade, it has failed to gain traction because digital slides alone have done little to improve workflows.

Computational pathology will provide the missing link in the adoption of digital pathology, moving this vital field forward with support tools to help pathologists make decisions with greater speed, accuracy, objectivity and reproducibility — and at a lower cost. Armed with AI enabled systems, pathologists will spend less time compiling data and more time interpreting data. They will better understand how a patient’s diagnosis affects treatment and recovery.

viewer1

In 2018 PAIGE’s slide viewer was rolled out institution-wide at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and is the single entry point for pathologists and cancer researchers.

“I believe we are entering the market with three core assets: better data, better expertise, and better people.” Mr. Breyer said.

Data: Successful AI systems rely on a massive amount of data to train robust, reproducible algorithms. Paige.AI has a partnership with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) and has exclusive access to all of MSK’s intellectual property in the field of computational pathology as well as exclusive rights to their library of 25 million pathology slides.

Domain Expertise: Raw image data is not enough to excel in complex pathology tasks. A successful AI must be trained on the highest quality (clinician-generated) domain-specific annotations. Paige.AI is innovating the annotation process, not only by developing dedicated annotation tools, but also by incorporating de-identified clinical data, treatment data, genomic analysis and survival data into comprehensive deep learning models.

Exceptional Talent: Paige.AI’s ML team of PhDs and computation experts is led by the founding father of Computational Pathology: Thomas Fuchs. Fuchs is the director of Computational Pathology in The Warren Alpert Center for Digital and Computational Pathology at MSK, and professor at Weill-Cornell, where he teaches Machine Learning. Dr. Fuchs published the first Computational Pathology paper in 2008, a review of the field in 2011 and more than 90 publications in machine learning and medicine.

MR JB

THE FUTURE OF AI: NEW WORK SUMMIT 2018 [VIDEO]

NEW YORK TIMES CONFERENCES

From health care and financial services to mobility and cybersecurity, start-ups that utilize artificial intelligence are some of the world’s hottest VC bets. Where do investors see AI’s greatest potential — and its potential shortcomings — today and far into the future?

Jim Breyer, Founder and C.E.O., Breyer Capital & Deep Nishar, Senior Managing Partner, SoftBank Vision Fund In conversation with Rebecca Blumenstein.

Read more info via:

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Breyer Capital is Leading the Series A Financing of Paige:AI

MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER is Honored to Announce that Breyer Capital is Leading the Series A Financing of Paige:AI 

#VC #Startup #AI #Pathology #MedicalTech

JB-Vest-Seated-Wall-Background

A true visionary – prominent investor in the world, Mr. Breyer and his firm, Breyer Capital, are leading a $25 million Series A round for Paige.AI , a New York-based startup applying AI to pathology to improve diagnosis and treatment of cancer. 

Introducing Paige.AI

Paige.AI has signed a comprehensive license with the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) to gain exclusive access to its intellectual property in computational pathology, as well as exclusive rights to its library of 25 million pathology slides. The de-identified data set is one of the world’s largest tumor pathology archives, the company said.

The company will be fully integrated into lab information systems by using the library to develop machine learning applications which is developing computational programs across diagnostic pathology and clinical annotations and anonymized genomic sequencing results such as starting with breast, prostate and other major cancers, according to a company press release.

“Over the next decade there will be several companies in the fields of artificial intelligence and medicine that will provide enormous investment returns and at the same time make fundamental differences in patients’ and doctors’ lives,” Mr. Breyer said.Screen Shot 2018-02-28 at 7.25.38 AMPathology is at the cornerstone of most cancer diagnoses, yet most pathologic diagnoses rely on manual, subjective processes developed ages ago. While slide digitization has been around for over a decade, it has failed to gain traction because digital slides alone have done little to improve workflows.

Computational pathology will provide the missing link in the adoption of digital pathology, moving this vital field forward with support tools to help pathologists make decisions with greater speed, accuracy, objectivity and reproducibility — and at a lower cost. Armed with AI enabled systems, pathologists will spend less time compiling data and more time interpreting data. They will better understand how a patient’s diagnosis affects treatment and recovery.

viewer1

In 2018 PAIGE’s slide viewer was rolled out institution-wide at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and is the single entry point for pathologists and cancer researchers.

“I believe we are entering the market with three core assets: better data, better expertise, and better people.” Mr. Breyer said.

Data: Successful AI systems rely on a massive amount of data to train robust, reproducible algorithms. Paige.AI has a partnership with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) and has exclusive access to all of MSK’s intellectual property in the field of computational pathology as well as exclusive rights to their library of 25 million pathology slides.

Domain Expertise: Raw image data is not enough to excel in complex pathology tasks. A successful AI must be trained on the highest quality (clinician-generated) domain-specific annotations. Paige.AI is innovating the annotation process, not only by developing dedicated annotation tools, but also by incorporating de-identified clinical data, treatment data, genomic analysis and survival data into comprehensive deep learning models.

Exceptional Talent: Paige.AI’s ML team of PhDs and computation experts is led by the founding father of Computational Pathology: Thomas Fuchs. Fuchs is the director of Computational Pathology in The Warren Alpert Center for Digital and Computational Pathology at MSK, and professor at Weill-Cornell, where he teaches Machine Learning. Dr. Fuchs published the first Computational Pathology paper in 2008, a review of the field in 2011 and more than 90 publications in machine learning and medicine.

MR JB

THE FUTURE OF AI: NEW WORK SUMMIT 2018 [VIDEO]

NEW YORK TIMES CONFERENCES

From health care and financial services to mobility and cybersecurity, start-ups that utilize artificial intelligence are some of the world’s hottest VC bets. Where do investors see AI’s greatest potential — and its potential shortcomings — today and far into the future?

Jim Breyer, Founder and C.E.O., Breyer Capital & Deep Nishar, Senior Managing Partner, SoftBank Vision Fund In conversation with Rebecca Blumenstein.

Read more info via:

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Meet Me At Starbucks For A Gin And Tonic?

MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER:
#Lifestyle #F&B
Starbucks is About to Start Serving Cocktails (No, Not For Breakfast)

Would you go to Starbucks for a drink before, say, a movie?

Starbucks knows that the morning coffee routine can be dull.

Moreover, it’s always fancied itself to be a little Italian.

The coffee chain’s management has, though, always wished it could make Starbucks the place that you can go at any time of day, not just when you have a hangover.

So it’s going to start serving cocktails like
Italian-style.

As the Seattle Times reports, a new Seattle Reserve Starbucks will enjoy such delicacies as olives, parmigiano reggiano and, oh, cocktails such as Aperol and Campari.

And when do Italians partake of such delicacies?

Why, on their way to do doing something else.

“We want to be a part of the community and are looking forward to being a stop on the way to sporting events, on the way to theater, on the way to concerts,” Starbucks’ Shauna McKenzie-Lee told the Seattle Times.

Meet me at Starbucks for a gin and tonic?DEE18BB7-7823-4A0E-838E-9FA1F072F567

A New Tech Start-Up “Air Ticket Arena” (ATA) Will Let You Bid On Unsold Airline Tickets

Perfect for that last-minute getaway (picture)

MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER:

The New App Air Ticket Arena (ATA) Will Let You Bid On Unsold Airline Tickets

  • The app Air Ticket Arena is a new tech start-up that is based in the UK
  • It allows travellers to bid for any empty seats that might be available on flights
  • Up to 48 hours before the flight, customers find out if their bid is high enough

A new tech start-up Air Ticket Arena (ATA) is based in the UK. ATA is new cloud-based IT platform with a mobile application, which aims to enable last minute travelers to place bids on desired flights and jump into unsold seats in just 24/48 hours. Leisure travelers will be able to place bids, 14 days prior departure in advance and only find out if they have a seat on the plane just 48 hours before take-off.

ATA has launched on February 1 and gives you the opportunity to bid for last-minute plane tickets. The app is currently only available on Android in the Google Play store but will be available for Apple users in the coming March.

As a ATA user, you will not purchase an airline ticket. The travelers place bids on airlines, destinations, and desired departure days. The platform will match each traveler’s bid with a requested route, airline’s predefined requirements, and departure date.

Once your preferences are selected, you can place your bid on how much money you are willing to pay for the flight.

One to two days before the flight departs, the airline will see how many unsold seats they have and will automatically book you on the flight if you have bid the same price or higher than the minimum price they are willing to accept for the seat.

Air Ticket Arena is the first fully automated passenger centric solution, which matches unsold seats for scheduled flights with the airline’s profit and performance requirements. (Video on Vimeo)

Successful matches are eligible for further processing on the airline’s ticketing and pricing engines. The winning travelers will receive an e-ticket and flight information at least 24/48 hours before departure flight.

“We are all aware of many empty seats on our last flight. For airliners, every empty seat is complete loss, and for every traveller is an opportunity,” said Kresimir Budinski, founder and managing director of Air Ticket Arena Ltd.

Air Ticket Arena is the first fully automated platform which matches unsold seats on scheduled flights with air traveller’s bids.

AirTicketArena Ltd. (the “Company”) is a private company limited by shares established under Laws of England and Wales on 17th November 2015 with its headquarters registered on 77-79 High Street, Egham, Surrey, TW20 9HY, United Kingdom.

They are raising £850.000 in February 2018 for expansion and growth.

The minimum investment per new investor is £25,000 (twenty-five thousand). Please see a “Register for a copy of Investment package” via https://www.airticketarena.com/investors

 

Read more info via:

https://www.airticketarena.com

 

 

 

 

Startup “Ziroom” – Chinese Apartment Rental Service Provider has raised 4 Billion Yuan ($621 Million USD) in a Series A Funding Round Led by Warburg Pincus

 MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER:

#Startup #VC #SeriesAFundJAN2018

Startup “Ziroom” – Chinese Apartment Rental Service Provider has raised 4 Billion Yuan ($621 Million USD) in a Series A Funding Round Led by Warburg Pincus

Sequoia Capital and Tencent also invest in the apartment rental service provider

BEIJING— Ziroom, a Chinese Apartment Rental Service Provider. Founded in 2011, Beijing-based Ziroom leases apartment units, renovates them and subleases them to long-term tenants. It manages 500,000 rooms and serves 1.2 million tenants in nine cities around China. It also operates eight service apartment buildings.  The company plans to increase the number of rooms under its management to 800,000 this year.

Ziroom has raised 4 billion yuan ($621 million USD) in a Series A funding round led by a group of investors including private-equity firm Warburg Pincus, Tencent, and Sequoia Capital China, according to a statement released by Warburg Pincus, as Beijing pushes the growth of a rental market to curb skyrocketing home prices in large cities.

Screen Shot 2018-01-23 at 3.31.17 AM

“Ziroom is China’s biggest professional asset management firm, and has advantages in customer acquisition, big data application and rental management,” said Julian Cheng, managing director and co-head of China at Warburg Pincus. “After interviewing hundreds of tenants, we found Ziroom’s reputation is higher than the industry average.”

Proceeds from the funding will be used to expand the company’s existing businesses in Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, as well as adding new operations in cities such as Hangzhou, Wuhan and Guangzhou. It will also upgrade its services to include maintenance and house moving as well as invest in technologies such as smart furniture and big data, according to its CEO Xiong Lin.

This is the third investment made by Warburg Pincus in China’s institutional apartment rental sector. It invested in Mofang, China’s first and leading centralized institutional apartment developer-operator, in 2012, and co-founded Nova to focus on the acquisition of aged and distressed properties in urban infill locations in 2015. The Chinese government has been pushing for the development of the country’s home rental market to address urban newcomers’ housing demand.

With government backing, the sector is attracted increased investments. Last September, Warburg Pincus committed a US$183 million follow-on investment into Nova Property Investment Co. Ltd, a Chinese rental apartment operator and asset manager. Last July, IDG Capital and Chinese hotel management company Huazhu Hotels Group Ltd. led a US$50 million pre-A round in Chengjia Apartment, an apartment rental start-up.

The Chinese government has been pushing the development of the home rental market to address housing demand from urban newcomer. Last August, 12 major cities in China introduced pilot programs that allows tenants of rental properties to enjoy the same access to public services as property owners.

“We strongly believed in the growth potential of apartment rental sector since six years ago and remain committed. We are actively responding to the government’s policy to promote apartment leasing by providing more and better rental properties to the market,” Ziroom chairman Hui Zuo said.Screen Shot 2018-01-23 at 3.31.49 AM

The Chinese government has been pushing for the development of the country’s home rental market to address urban newcomers’ housing demand.

Read more info. via:
https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/ziroom

http://www.ziroomapartment.com

http://www.ziroom.com

What Do You See AI in 2018?

 

MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER:
#AI #MachineLearning #DeepLearning #BigData #Analytics #HealthTech #IoT #Tech #Chatbots

Artificial Intelligence (AI) remained the driving force of various industries in 2017. With so many tech giants and startups already delving into the AI ecosystem, it is expected to grow with better use cases in the year 2018. Considering the acceptance, development, and applications of AI, here we are with significant opportunities and perils that this ingenious technology will put forth in 2018.

7 Artificial Intelligence Trends that will Rule 2018

1. AI Integration with Web and Mobile Apps

“Over the next few years every app, application and service will incorporate AI at some level.” — Gartner (Click to Tweet)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is anticipated to be on the quiet in most of the web and mobile applications. This inventive technology would be the battlefront for most of the software and services industry.

AI in the form of machine learning, deep learning, computer vision etc. enable developers to build intelligent apps. Some of the examples that exhibits and justify AI integration of apps includes abstraction of big data, enabling recommendations, smart search, fraud detection, healthcare and fitness management etc. In the following year, we could see expansion in use cases and result in productive intelligent apps, without developers being explicitly coding for it.

2. There will be a Surge in Chatbots Number

Chatbots are another use case of Artificial Intelligence that developers can put to use. Bots are not just facilitating individuals to get anytime support but also helping businesses in augmenting their customer support and utilize human intelligence for more productive tasks.

Considering the acceptance and popularity of these communication channels, a number of tech giants like Facebook, announced platforms and tools to build chatbot for business. According to IBM, 65% of Generation Y prefers interacting to bots. In June 2017, Facebook announced 11,000 bots for Messengers. With such great numbers and positive response, we could see bots becoming the frontrunner of customer service industry in the following time.

3. Intelligent Things will be the Trend

In the year 2018, we could have Intelligent Things ruling, an artistic intersection of Internet of Things (IoT) and Artificial Intelligence. So basically, what these intelligent things do is they use AI and ML to interact with the surrounding or people, in an intelligent manner. Or, they can make the existing things intelligent. Example: Turning camera into smart camera or using fitness tracker to not only monitor health but analyzing the user routine (using machine learning) to recommend changes for improving health or avoid risk.

4. AI will back Medical Research/Diagnosis/Treatment

One of the various industries that are disrupted by Artificial Intelligence is Healthcare. Making the most of AI applications like cognitive learning, big data management, deep learning, healthcare industry is pulling off a number of diagnosis, treatment, and research processes.

According to an Accenture analysis, the healthcare market is projected to reach 6.6 billion by 2021. Big brands like IBM (Watson, Medical Seive), Google (Deepmind Health), Atomwise (Drug discovery with AI) are heavily investing in Artificial Intelligence to put forth the finest healthcare solutions. And considering the scope that AI brings in, a number of startups are pulling out the best from AI and will continue to grow in time to come.

5. More Hardware will be Powered by AI

Artificial Intelligence has made us believe in future where complex decisions can be taken faster, automatically through learned experiences. And this is not just possible with the software applications. In the following time, we could see hardware industry paying more attention to AI and its applications.

In Oct 2017, Intel announced about Nervana Neural Network Processor family of chips that is specially designed for Artificial Intelligence use cases. These chips will be shipped by the end of this year. Also, the year 2017 has seen brands and individual developers working on a number of projects that are powered by AI, which includes bit is not limited to drones (Skydio), vehicles (Driverless cars), robots.

6. More AI Based Startups will Launch

AI is evolving and its potential is being realized by businesses and individuals. If Angellist is referred, it reports that over 3,510 companies with 2,562 investors, and 4.9 million average pre-money valuation are listed there. And in the recent past, we have seen tech names like Intel, Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon taking over a number of smart AI startups. We can expect this to be followed up in the year 2018, with startups fetching an attractive funding.

7. AI will Impact the Workforce

Amongst the various perils of Artificial Intelligence, it’s impact on human jobs is the most debatable one. Forrester predicts that cognitive technologies (ML, automation, robots etc) will replace the 7% of US jobs by 2025.

However, if the the applications of AI are perceived well, this ingenious technology will augment the human jobs, instead of replacing it. And to be precise, the impact of AI on human workforce will be dependent upon the type of job. For example: If you are a customer service executive, intelligent chatbots might serve your purpose to a business. However, with AI, we can see augmentation in jobs like data scientists, robot monitoring, automation monitoring etc.

What do you see AI disrupting 2018?

Manufacturing, healthcare, entertainment, retail, automotive! AI has caused disruption in almost every industry and with this massive technology growing steadily, the following year could see some better use cases and innovations. AI development services will also experience a consequential rise, resulting in mobile applications of AI, reaching a large share of users.

What you think about AI possibilities in 2018? What could be its best use case according to you? Share your views with us in the comments below.


Originally published at appdevelopment.daffodilsw.com.

Fashion Tech Sweater for Winter – Engineers Develop Floating Solar Fuels Rig for Seawater Electrolysis

MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER:

#FashionTech #MOQIFashionTechActiveWear #ScienceTech

#ColumbiaUniversitySchoolofEngineeringandAppliedScience

Fashion Tech Sweater for Winter – Engineers Develop Floating Solar Fuels Rig for Seawater Electrolysis

Two mesh electrodes are held at a narrow separation distance (L), and generate H2 and O2 gases concurrently. The key innovation is the asymmetric placement of the catalyst on the outward facing surfaces of the mesh, such that the generation of bubbles is constrained to this region. When the gas bubbles detach, their buoyancy causes them to float upward into separate collection chambers.Image credit: Credit: Daniel Esposito/Columbia Engineering

Screen Shot 2018-01-23 at 1.48.17 AM

In a single hour, more energy from the sun hits the Earth than all the energy used by humankind in an entire year. Imagine if the sun’s energy could be harnessed to power energy needs on Earth, and done in a way that is economical, scalable, and environmentally responsible. Researchers have long seen this as one of the grand challenges of the 21st century.

Daniel Esposito, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has been studying water electrolysis?the splitting of water into oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) fuel?as a way to convert electricity from solar photovoltaics (PVs) into storable hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen is a clean fuel that is currently used to propel rockets in NASA’s space program and is widely expected to play an important role in a sustainable  future. The vast majority of today’s hydrogen is produced from natural gas through a process called steam methane reforming that simultaneously releases CO2, but water electrolysis using electricity from solar PV offers a promising route to produce H2 without any associated CO2 emissions.

Esposito’s team has now developed a novel photovoltaic-powered electrolysis device that can operate as a stand-alone platform that floats on open water. His floating PV-electrolyzer can be thought of as a “solar fuels rig” that bears some resemblance to deep-sea oil rigs, except that it would produce hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water instead of extracting petroleum from beneath the sea floor. The study, “Floating Membraneless PV-Electrolyzer Based on Buoyancy-Driven Product Separation,” was published today by International Journal of Hydrogen Energy.

The researchers’ key innovation is the method by which they separate the H2 and O2 gasses produced by water electrolysis. State-of-the-art electrolyzers use expensive membranes to maintain separation of these two gases. The Columbia Engineering device relies instead on a novel  configuration that allows the gases to be separated and collected using the buoyancy of bubbles in water. The design enables efficient operation with high product purity and without actively pumping the electrolyte. Based on the concept of buoyancy-induced separation, the simple electrolyzer architecture produces H2 with purity as high as 99 percent.

“The simplicity of our PV-electrolyzer architecture?without a membrane or pumps?makes our design particularly attractive for its application to seawater electrolysis, thanks to its potential for low cost and higher durability compared to current devices that contain membranes,” says Esposito, whose Solar Fuels Engineering Laboratory develops solar and electrochemical technologies that convert renewable and abundant solar energy into storable chemical fuels. “We believe that our prototype is the first demonstration of a practical membraneless floating PV-electrolyzer system, and could inspire large-scale ‘solar fuels rigs’ that could generate large quantities of H2  from abundant sunlight and seawater without taking up any space on land or competing with fresh water for agricultural uses.”

Commercial electrolyzer devices rely on a membrane, or divider, to separate the electrodes within the device from which H2 and O2 gas are produced. Most of the research for electrolysis devices has been focused on devices that incorporate a membrane. These membranes and dividers are prone to degradation and failure and require a high purity water source. Seawater contains impurities and microorganisms that can easily destroy these membranes.

“Being able to safely demonstrate a device that can perform electrolysis without a membrane brings us another step closer to making seawater electrolysis possible,” says Jack Davis, the paper’s first author and a PhD student working with Esposito. “These solar fuels generators are essentially artificial photosynthesis systems, doing the same thing that plants do with photosynthesis, so our device may open up all kinds of opportunities to generate clean, renewable energy.”

Crucial to the operation of Esposito’s PV-electrolyzer is a novel electrode configuration comprising mesh flow-through electrodes that are coated with a catalyst only on one side. These asymmetric electrodes promote the evolution of gaseous H2 and O2 products on only the outer surfaces of the electrodes where the catalysts have been deposited. When the growing H2 and O2 bubbles become large enough, their buoyancy causes them to detach from the electrode surfaces and float upwards into separate overhead collection chambers.

The team used the Columbia Clean Room to deposit platinum electrocatalyst onto the mesh electrodes and the 3D-printers in the Columbia Makerspace to make many of the reactor components. They also used a high-speed video camera to monitor transport of H2 and O2 bubbles between electrodes, a process known as “crossover.” Crossover between electrodes is undesirable because it decreases product purity, leading to safety concerns and the need for downstream separation units that make the process more expensive.

In order to monitor H2 and O2 crossover events, the researchers incorporated windows in all of their electrolysis devices so that they could take high-speed videos of gas bubble evolution from the electrodes while the  was operating. These videos were typically taken at a rate of 500 frames per second (a typical iPhone captures video at a rate of 30 frames per second).

The team is refining their design for more efficient operation in real seawater, which poses additional challenges compared to the more ideal aqueous electrolytes used in their laboratory studies. They also plan to develop modular designs that they can use to build larger, scaled-up systems.

Esposito adds: “There are many possible technological solutions to achieve a sustainable energy future, but nobody knows exactly what specific technology or combination of technologies will be the best to pursue. We are especially excited about the potential of  technologies because of the tremendous amount of solar energy that is available. Our challenge is to find scalable and economical technologies that convert sunlight into a useful form of energy that can also be stored for times when the sun is not shining.”

The study is titled “Floating Membraneless PV-Electrolyzer Based on Buoyancy-Driven Product Separation.”

More information: “Floating Membraneless PV-Electrolyzer Based on Buoyancy-Driven Product Separation,” International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (2017). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036031991734466X , DOI: 10.1016/j.ijhydene.2017.11.086

Provided by: Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

 

Announcing the $150 Million “Rise Of The Rest” Seed Fund

MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER:
Heads up!!! Entrepreneurs and Startups!
Announcing the $150 Million “Rise Of The Rest” Seed Fund

The rest shall rise, this is so great for founders outside of Silicon Valley @Revolution – A Bevy Of Billionaires Join Steve Case’s $150 Million ‘Rise Of The Rest’ Startup Fund

“MY TAKE: Why we launched #RiseOfRest seed fund?” said Steve Case.

37C8DC04-DE68-4F29-A4E9-A816E41C6764

At Revolution, we believe that some of the most compelling investment opportunities in the next decade will emerge from startups in cities all across the United States — not just in Silicon Valley. With the addition of the Rise of the Rest Seed Fund, Revolution is now positioned to support startups at every stage of their lifecycle. More on our new $150M Fund…

Via Steve Case

Read and watch more via:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/announcing-150-million-rise-rest-seed-fund-steve-case

Famed VC Jim Breyer on finding the next Mark Zuckerberg (and much more)

MOQIPEOPLE INSIDER:

Famed VC Jim Breyer on finding the next Mark Zuckerberg (and much more)

Connie Loizos
TechCrunch November 8, 2017

Jim Breyer

Yesterday, at the Web Summit conference in Lisbon, we caught up with Jim Breyer, among the most famous venture capitalists in Silicon Valley thanks to a decades-long track record of smart bets, most notably in Facebook.

Yesterday, at the Web Summit conference in Lisbon, we caught up with Jim Breyer, among the most famous venture capitalists in Silicon Valley thanks to a decades-long track record of smart bets, most notably in Facebook. Breyer was the managing partner at Accel Partners, which invested $12.7 million in Facebook in 2005 when the company was priced around $100 million, and that returned many billions of dollars to its investors after the company went public in 2012.

In 2013, Breyer segued out of the firm, opening up his own family office, called Breyer Capital, where he has continued to make bold bets. Breyer has also partnered over the years with the Chinese firm IDG Capital Partners, which formerly collaborated with Accel Partners and where Breyer Capital has since become an anchor investor in a series of funds that now manage more than $4 billion.

Breyer will be taking the stage today, but he also sat down with us behind the scenes yesterday to talk about Facebook, Softbank, and ICOs, among other factors playing an outsize role in the startup ecosystem. You can find much of that conversation below, edited for length.

TC: You’ve just come to Lisbon from China. How much time do you spend there?

JB: I’m there four times a year. I probably have 100 partners who are part of IDG China, where Breyer Capital is a sponsor and I’m a general partner on the investment committee and we cover 10 cities in China.

TC: Meanwhile, you’re also overseeing Breyer Capital, your family office. How active is that, and is its focus exclusively on U.S. companies?

JB: We make six to 10 new investments a year, investing in artificial intelligence and deep learning mostly, and how it applies to finance, healthcare, publishing, and other large verticals, and yes, [the investments are stateside].

Breyer Capital, it’s a family office, makes six to 10 new investments a year, starting in 2013. Still a partner in historical Accel funds, investing in AI mostly and deep learning and how it applies to finance healthcare publishing and other large vertical. Breyer stateside investments.

TC: Before sitting down today, I’d seen a CNBC interview you’d given, where you said you expect to see a number of big companies focused around artificial intelligence that are even bigger, much bigger, than Facebook and its ilk today. I think of Google and Facebook and Amazon and Apple as having an insurmountable lead, given the monopoly they have on these huge data sets. Why are you so sure that’s not the case?

JB: Mark Zuckerberg, Tim Cook, [Alibaba founder] Jack Ma, [Tencent founder] Pony Ma, [Baidu founder] Robin Li — these are phenomenal founder-driven companies and I expect the Apples, Facebooks, Amazons, Alphabets, and Baidus will only get stronger in many ways. But the early stages to apply deep learning and true artificial intelligence to large verticals [is immense].

For example, doctor recommendations around cancer research — both in the U.S. and China, where we can pull together data from hospitals, analyze that data in ways that have never been possible before, and provide better potential advice to doctors and nurses — those are just great opportunities for startups.

TC: That sounds great. At the same time, I’m still confused as to how nascent AI teams get very far. It seems that most are either getting pulled into these bigger companies before their companies can really prove themselves, or else they’re having to focus on very small verticals — like assessing the health of cabbages — and building a data set around them. Can AI teams still build big defensible businesses?

JB: I’m no longer on the board of Facebook, but I have these conversations with Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg all the time, and it’s interesting. Facebook continues to grow dramatically but they’re also optimistic about startups and building new companies than ever before. Yes, there are strong founder-driven companies, but I don’t think it’s about fringe opportunities.

TC: You mentioned AI in healthcare. Where else do you see these bigger opportunities?

JB: I’m an investor in [the publicly traded video distribution platform] Bright Cove, and out of Brighcove came Circle Internet, which is a four-year-old blockchain company that’s applying AI to financial services to address how to deliver better payment services around the world, who should receive some lending, and should whether they should receive it it in euros, pounds, dollars, or different coins. A lot of that is AI applied to the blockchain and to digital currencies.

TC: You think we’ll see giant AI companies. Do you think you’ve met the next Mark Zuckerberg yet?

JB: I don’t think I’ll ever find a Mark Zuckerberg. And the combination of Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, who I helped Mark hire in 2008 – I don’t think I’ll ever find a team like that again. Sheryl’s opportunities to make Mark better, Mark’s opportunities to make Sheryl better – that combination is the best single leadership combination in the world. In fact, they’re two of the key references on so many of the new deals that I do.

TC: You’re getting their advice on potential investments?

JB: Absolutely — and reference checks on people who might be from Google or Apple or Amazon. Not a day goes by when I’m not in contact with Facebook executives about a potential new deal or recruiting. They’ve been a wonderful source of both references on new deals in AI, specifically, or in talent management and referrals of executives who I meet who are potentially future founders or future executives of these AI companies.

TC: Does that put the company or executive or founder on the watch list of Facebook and — for good or bad — does it increase the likelihood that Facebook will try and gobble them up at an early stage?

JB: The experience I have is that when I’m meeting with the top talent, the ability at some point – say 12 or 24 months from now – to speak with Sheryl Sandberg or Mark Zuckerberg or some of the senior people at Facebook, they view it as a big positive.

TC: Are Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg de facto venture partners of yours, or is that overstating things?

JB: That would be too much. But they are very much part of almost every due diligence process that I’ve done.

TC: Do you help them with their diligence? Do either of them make private investments?

JB: They don’t make too many private investments, but I certainly offer them advice and sometimes they listen on either people or opportunities or . . . different elements of Facebook and its global opportunities.

TC: Speaking of Facebook, can you comment on these newly revealed ties between early Facebook investor Yuri Milner and the Kremlin? He’s very well-regarded in Silicon Valley circles. Does this development change anything?

JB: I’m a fan of Yuri. I’ve known him since 2010. I just don’t know more than that. He’s a very good investor. Would it affect your dealing with Milner right now?
[Shrugs.] I just don’t know [what’s going to happen].

TC: I’ve heard you say that according to experts you’ve talked with, AI will have the same self-learning ability as humans by 2050. How does that impact how you proceed as an investor?

JB: I take a 20-year view on investing. With AI, I’m firmly in the camp that the benefits for the next couple decades far outweigh the negatives. Based on the very best computer scientists who I routinely meet with, at Stanford, MIT, Berkeley, Tsinghua, Oxford and Cambridge – there is a belief that the pace is extraordinary. But it’s likely not before 2050 where we reach a point of singularity and the robots and the machine learning is potentially more intelligent than what is today human intelligence.

TC: And then? Are you worried about the world your grandchildren will be navigating?

JB: I absolutely believe that philosophically, we should be thinking about the ethical implications long term of artificial intelligence and how it’s applied, and that should be part of what we do as investors and entrepreneurs and academics. Those are discussions that I love being a part of. I don’t think that we can just push that aside and not have those discussions.

TC: Do you think there will be a limited number of companies and jobs? Will people be relying on a basic income? What do you see beyond 2050? What about 100 years from now?

JB: I love that, that’s real long term! [Laughs.] I think the pie will get bigger for almost everyone, [with] the right implementation of technologies. I’m on the board of Harvard University and I’m part of the president’s search, and I’ve been spending a lot of time with presidential candidates. And these are questions I ask many of the academics I’m talking with, and I think we’ll see universities, colleges and education very positively affected by these technologies, because I think we can educate students around the world. Teaching will improve. Most importantly, learning will improve if we all take a long-term view, and I believe many jobs will be created that we can’t predict right now.

TC: Do you think we’ll need to regulate artificial intelligence, as Elon Musk has suggested time and again needs to happen?

JB: I think it would be a huge mistake to actively regulate artificial intelligence and artificial intelligence technologies. I do think there’s a role for government officials to be thinking about jobs as they related to artificial intelligence. But in terms of regulation, it would be a mistake because we’re just at the beginning of innovation [and because] it’s global. In many ways, we’re in a race with other economies – whether China or some of the European centers that are trying to recreate Silicon Valley-like hubs – so I think it would be a mistake to regulate research at this point.

TC: Where are we going to see the most growth in coming decades? In the states? In Europe? In China? Do you think Silicon Valley will lose its place as the power center of tech?

JB: I would never bet against Silicon Valley, having done this for a couple of decades. Silicon Valley and China will remain so much at the center.

TC: And on a par with one another?

JB: I think so. China has five million graduating engineers every year. That’s 10x [the number of engineers graduating each year from U.S. schools]. We have the very best universities in the world. At the same time, China is developing a phenomenal group of technologists, engineers, and mathematicians.

TC: We haven’t talked about Japan, but how does Softbank change the landscape, in your opinion? Does the capital at its disposal change everything?

JB: It does. I know the SoftBank leadership. We’ve co-invested together. We compete at times. The late-stage venture capital business is forever changed by what Softbank is doing.
For the earliest-stage companies, where there might be a group of brilliant scientists and engineers, 20 to 30 people, and they aren’t looking to raise $50 million; they’re looking to raise $10 million. It’s very competitive still and it’s where I love to partner and compete. The opportunity to scale and build a global business is still very high.

TC: Do you think SoftBank is a kingmaker? I suppose there’s a chance they’ll actually drown some companies in capital, but I’d be worried if they funded a competitor of mine.

JB: In certain segments where capital and scale make such a difference, Softbank is going to change the nature of the game. For a lot of industries in a lot of segments, such as AI, you’re trying to find 10 or 20 of the very best medical AI researchers in the world, and that’s where it’s the talent scarcity more than a capital scarcity that plays a central role. But for certain other businesses, SoftBank is making a very big difference.

TC: Before you go, ICOs. Here to say? Short-term phenomenon?

JB: I think they’ll be a part of the overall financing landscape over the next five to 10 years, and that we’ll see ICOs and different coins. It’s very hard to predict: Does Ethereum win? Which other coin might it be? But for sure, the nature of fintech and digital finance will result in more fundraising options for entrepreneurs at all stages. I just don’t think it will change overnight.

TC: You own bitcoin. Have you participated in any pre-sales of ICOs?

JB: Not yet, but I’m looking closely and globally. There are a lot of opportunities that I’m evaluating but I haven’t decided are compelling at this point.
This article originally appeared on TechCrunch.

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